June 26-July 2, 2006: Gwendolyn Beyer and Norman Pollack

week of June 26-July 2, 2006



Gwendolyn Beyer and Norman Pollack


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Gwendolyn Beyer
gwensbeat@yahoo.com

Bio (auto)

Gwendolyn Beyer spent most of her childhood in Los Angeles, CA and Woodstock, NY growing up amidst artistic friends and family She has been writing since she was 7 years old but only recently has come out of her writing shell She currently lives in Burbank with her husband and son.

The following work is Copyright © 2006, and owned by Gwendolyn Beyer and may not be distributed or reprinted in any form whatsoever without written permission from the author.

Alligator Babies

Little bastard
mutant alligator babies
you have thousands
living in the sewers
waiting to make your acquaintance
you didn‚t think about that
when you washed them down
didn‚t think they‚d find you
now they arrive
with suitcase in hand
wanting to know their dad
and they have a plan
a few years room and board
as they go to school
that‚s right, your little mutant children
have come back to haunt you
you should have thought twice
before you flushed them down the pipe


Norman Pollack
norman@unsoft.com

Bio (auto)

A former high school English teacher in suburban New Jersey, I have owned several bookstores and served as executive director for non-profit organizations I have many interests and hobbies including classical music, teaching poetry, leading book discussion groups, board games, and computers I also have an online poetry workshop (www.poemtrain.com) My poetry is eclectic˜much of it is free verse but a large portion is also written in more than thirty of the classic structured forms

The following work is Copyright © 2006, and owned by Norman Pollack and may not be distributed or reprinted in any form whatsoever without written permission from the author.

Darwinian Bereshit

In the beginning,
tail gone,
genetalia exposed,
there was nothing
to take off
and we were without
form
and void.


Bitter Herbs

This evening
you left
a taste in my mouth
like bitter herbs;
my conscience whispered,
“Why should this night be different from any other night?”