January 30 – February 5, 2012: Nathaniel S. Rounds and John Grey

week of January 30 – February 5, 2012

Nathaniel S. Rounds and John Grey

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Nathaniel S. Rounds
nsrounds@gmail.com

Bio (auto)

A reformed photographer born in Wichita Falls, Texas, Nathaniel S. Rounds writes from Halifax, Nova Scotia.

The following work is Copyright © 2012, and owned by Nathaniel S. Rounds and may not be distributed or reprinted in any form whatsoever without written permission from the author.


So Much Glass to So Much Steel

Behind a clear, glass veil
Facing a snarling, spitting sea
And the dim shadow of Georges Island
I spent nine dollars
From Mother’s retirement cheque
On gelato down at the bay
Birra Moretti in a coffee cup
And for a frat boy twist
Greek fries with chopsticks

Outside this farmer’s market
A distant cousin with payot and a suit of sky-by-night
Nods his head and fedora in a courtly fashion
To the bag boy and his toil

And the train enters and do-si-dos
With kindred spirit trains
To the strain of whistles blown
For dream time



John Grey
jgrey10233@aol.com

Bio (auto)

Australian born poet, works as financial systems analyst. Recently published in Poem, Caveat Lector, Prism International and the horror anthology, “What Fears Become” with work upcoming in Big Muddy, Prism International and Pinyon.

The following work is Copyright © 2012, and owned by John Grey and may not be distributed or reprinted in any form whatsoever without written permission from the author.

Fisherman

Some day your thoughts
will bob about like worms on a hook
and snare nothing.
Your blood will be sludge,
a stream filled with silt.
The slowest trout
will be too quick for you.

But we’ll still share
those grassy shorelines.
We’ll still inquire of unseen life
with our rods and reels.
As meager as the haul may be,
our creels won’t go unrewarded.

And remember,
though your arteries are hard,
and fingers loose around the fore-grip,
the current is not closed to you,
the waters don’t turn their back.
Our streams are undivided.
We throw our lines in and we catch.