December 14-20, 2020: Poetry from Phil Huffy and William Heath

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Phil Huffy

Phil Huffy is a busy poet who writes in a variety of styles.  His work is found in dozens of journals and anthologies, and he has published two collections: Rhymal Therapy (limericks) and Magic Words (children’s verse).

The following work is Copyright © 2020, and owned by Phil Huffy and may not be distributed or reprinted in any form whatsoever without written permission from the author.

I Said, Pointedly

Author, watch your language,
avoid the common traps
of amateur expression
and paraphrastic lapse.

Banish inclinations,
when speech you recollect,
to state the speaker’s motive,
describing her affect.

Poet, please consider
this thought as apropos:
You’ll make your meaning clearer
with words that people know.

If you fancy rhyming,
its use must be astute.
Don’t make your grand allusions
a trivial pursuit.

William Heath

William Heath has taught American literature and creative writing at Kenyon, Transylvania, Vassar, the University of Seville, and Mt. St. Mary’s University, where the William Heath Award is given annually to the best student writer.  He is the author of two chapbooks, Night Moves in Ohio and Leaving Seville; a book of poems, The Walking Man; three novels, The Children Bob Moses Led, Devil Dancer, and Blacksnake’s Path; an award-winning work of history, William Wells and the Struggle for the Old Northwest; and a collection of interviews, Conversations with Robert Stone.  For more info visit: www.williamheathbooks.com

The following work is Copyright © 2020, and owned by William Heath​ and may not be distributed or reprinted in any form whatsoever without written permission from the author.

Trump Reads Wittgenstein,
Changes Tune

“The world is everything that is
the case.” He never knew that
before. He thought whatever
he wanted to be the case, was.
He uttered what fit his fancy
and confirmed his delusions
of grandeur, tossed raw flesh
for his base to feed on—
to view the big picture,
he gazed in a full-length mirror.

“Whereof one knows nothing,
thereof remain silent.” That
was a revelation. He assumed
nothing in the wide world
was worth knowing. The solution:
change his tune. And lo it came
to pass—abruptly he retired
from public life, last seen
doddering on a putting green,
never to speak one more word.