February 24 – March 1, 2020: Poetry from Maggie Westland and Corey Mesler

Maggie Westland and Corey Mesler

Send us your poetry for POET OF THE WEEK consideration.
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Maggie Westland
nanamaggie14@gmail.com

Bio (auto)

Maggie began writing early, and had her first publication in grade school. Although most of her work has been in verse, her poems often have plots and story lines beyond simple rhyme or image. Maggie plans to pass her life story on to her children and grandchildren via a memory diary from which her memoirs continue to evolve.

The following work is Copyright © 2020, and owned by Maggie Westland and may not be distributed or reprinted in any form whatsoever without written permission from the author.


Cosmology

The world is spinning round itself,
And also chasing round the sun;
The sun and earth together spin
At the edge of the galaxy’s arm.

Galaxies spin around themselves
Like Fourth-of -July pinwheels,
And move as the universe expands,
And I think that I’m standing still!

 

 

 


Corey Mesler
meslercorey@gmail.com

Bio (auto)

Corey Mesler has been published in numerous anthologies and journals including Poetry, Gargoyle, Five Points, Good Poems American Places, and New Stories from the South. He has published over 20 books of fiction and poetry. He also wrote the screenplay for We Go On, which won The Memphis Film Prize in 2017. With his wife he runs Burke’s Book Store (est. 1875) in Memphis. Visit Corey on the web here.

The following work is Copyright © 2020, and owned by Corey Mesler and may not be distributed or reprinted in any form whatsoever without written permission from the author.


Marriage License

Inside the stone
I heard a voice.
It was not, as
at first I believed,
the voice of
the stone. Later,
when you
came around, you
asked me if I
believed in
Heaven. I thought
about the
stone. I took
your slim, de-
licate hands
and kissed away
the rings left by rings.


More About the Stone

The teachers gathered us
in the library. They
wanted to stop something
before it started.
They would not tell us
the story of the stone,
how they came to know it,
but they warned us
against its dominion.
This intrigued us, of course,
and some of us met at
Jimmy Trippet’s house
to talk about what we would
do once the stone came,
how we would move
slowly, with determination,
toward the circle the
stone created by its stillness.
How we would make
it ours and how afterward we
would know better than
our teachers about pre-
paring anyone for the stone.