September 16-22, 2019: Poetry from Kate Alsbury and Ryan Quinn Flanagan

Kate Alsbury and Ryan Quinn Flanagan

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Kate Alsbury
katealsbury@gmail.com

Bio (auto)

Kate Alsbury is writer and marketing consultant. She’s the founder of Jalmurra, a journal dedicated to spreading awareness for environmental issues through art. Her work has appeared in several publications including “The Heron’s Nest” and “Failed Haiku.”She was featured on “Poetry Pea” podcast in 2018. Visit Kate on the web here.

The following work is Copyright © 2019, and owned by Kate Alsbury and may not be distributed or reprinted in any form whatsoever without written permission from the author.

 

Price Paid

wild pansies
the boldest
loses its head

The Buzz Of August

summer hike—
we talk of our future
a hornet’s nest nearby

 

 


Ryan Quinn Flanagan
ryanquinnflanagan@hotmail.com

Bio (auto)

Ryan Quinn Flanagan is a Canadian-born author residing in Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada with his wife and many bears that rifle through his garbage.  His work can be found both in print and online in such places as: Evergreen Review, The New York Quarterly, Poetry Super Highway, In Between Hangovers, Red Fez, and The Oklahoma Review. Ryan’s collection Leaving Las Vegas was published in August, 2019 on Whiskey Press.

The following work is Copyright © 2019, and owned by Ryan Quinn Flanagan and may not be distributed or reprinted in any form whatsoever without written permission from the author.

 

Tara Bytes

You don’t get to choose your parents
and your parents choose your name
and for some reason they already hate you
and want revenge and decide to start early
and your father is a tech genius, works in silicon valley,
calls you Tara which seems innocuous enough,
but your last name is Bytes
so things can’t be easy growing up in tech giant
central with a name like that,
like that Morrow kid down in Hollywood
that his parents chose to name Tu.

 

Corfu Master

I always come to things late.
Long after the conversation has happened.

Now that I am sitting at home
I realize he had probably said Kung-Fu master.

At the time,
I could not understand why he gave me
such a strange look.

I told him the Greeks were a proud people,
but that I thought his parents were Korean.

That was just about the time I got up to leave.
Now I know why he just waved goodbye
without looking.

I can be really slow sometimes.
Like your neighbourhood snail
with exceptional eyes.

 

 


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