November 14-20, 2016: Poetry from Diane Elayne Dees and Jeanie Greensfelder

​Diane Elayne Dees and Jeanie Greensfelder

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​Diane Elayne Dees
dianeedees@gmail.com

Bio (auto)

Diane Elayne Dees is a writer and psychotherapist in Covington, Louisiana. Her poems have appeared in many journals and anthologies. Diane also publishes Women Who Serve, which provides commentary on women’s professional tennis throughout the world.

The following work is Copyright © 2016, and owned by ​Diane Elayne Dees and may not be distributed or reprinted in any form whatsoever without written permission from the author.


Fashion Statement

In a closet in Chatauqua
hangs an elegant unworn pantsuit,
its silky fabric woven
to withstand the chilly weather
and the ravages of time.
Elsewhere, as the daylight dims,
everything unravels.

 



Jeanie Greensfelder
geniegreensfelder@gmail.com

Bio (auto)

Jeanie Greensfelder grew up in St. Louis, Missouri. A psychologist and poet, she seeks to understand herself and others on this shared journey, filled, as Joseph Campbell wrote, with sorrowful joys and joyful sorrows. She now lives in San Luis Obispo, CA with her husband Andy. She is the author of Biting the Apple (Penciled In, 2012), and Marriage and Other Leaps of Faith (Penciled In, 2015). Her poems have been published at Writer’s Almanac and American Life in Poetry; in anthologies and in multiple journals. Visit Jeanie on the web: jeaniegreensfelder.com and jeaniegreensfelder.blogspot.com.

The following work is Copyright © 2016, and owned by Jeanie Greensfelder and may not be distributed or reprinted in any form whatsoever without written permission from the author.


What We Knew In 1947

We knew about George Washington,
the axe, the tree: to never tell a lie.
In second grade we didn’t know much, but
we knew Bobby’s dad never got to third grade;
we knew to stay away from Hank Parker
who had lice; we knew men in cars would honk
and offer rides, but to just keep walking; we knew
to fend for ourselves after school;
we knew kids from the Hebrew Home
had been left there by their parents; we knew
the neighbor man who touched girls
and asked Does that feel good? We knew
to run past the domed insane asylum;
we knew Jamie had fits and fell on the floor—
we knew not to look, but we did; we knew
Joey stole candy from Mr. Wolff’s store;
we knew Nick Bell got a beating most nights; and
we knew not to tell grownups what we knew.


(from Biting the Apple, Penciled In, 2012)